BBQ Shrimp Louisiana Style

Cajun French: la chevrette (la shuv-ret) – shrimp

 

New Orleans BBQ Shrimp does not have BBQ sauce or anything related to BBQ. In fact, no one is sure how the name came about. What is sure, the original BBQ Shrimp was developed at Pascal’s Manale Restaurant in New Orleans in the 1950s. The recipe was based on a dish had by Vincent Sutro, a regular at Pascal’s, while visiting Chicago. Unfortunately Sutro could not remember the exact ingredients; something about shrimp, butter and pepper. So chef Jake Radosta went into the kitchen, came out with a dish and served Sutro. Sutro said it was not the dish he had in Chicago, but it was better than the dish he had. BBQ Shrimp was born and has been on the menu ever since. Today many restaurants and home cooks prepare BBQ Shrimp, each having their own twist.

Being Cajun, we add our own twist to the recipe. To be honest, it is the way it was prepared in Laurie’s family. The Cajun Trinity is smothered down in olive oil before adding anything else. We like it this way because the trinity gives the gravy some substance, especially when dipping bread.

We admit there is an enormous amount of butter. But then that is what makes the gravy so good. Don’t shortchange on the butter. It is not an everyday dish, so make it and savor every bite.

Mais C’est Bon!

Enjoy!! Continue reading “BBQ Shrimp Louisiana Style”

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Let’s Zydeco

Cajun French: la tomate (la tō-mat) — Tomato

HOT!

It’s summer, it’s New Orleans, it’s HOT!

Hot describes the last few weeks in south Louisiana.  Okay so it is nothing out of the ordinary, it  is still HOT!  Some people may believe  Southerns stay in the air conditioning and sip mint juleps – not so.  We go out in the heat, dance, eat and enjoy festivals.  The weekend of June 11th was the Vieux To Do Festival in New Orleans.  Vieux To Do is three festivals in one – Cajun/Zydeco Music, Creole  Tomato, and Seafood.

 

Mais C’est Bon!

Enjoy!!

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Shrimp Remoulade Wrap

Cajun French: la chevrette (la shuv-ret) – shrimp

Brocato's Eat Dat Shrimp Wrap

Brocato’s Eat Dat Restaurant in East New Orleans was one of the food vendors at the Vieux To Do Festival in New Orleans in early June and this recipe was inspired by the wrap from their booth.  We ate lots of great food, many of our favorites, yet for us this particular dish was number one this year.

Everyone has their favorite Remoulade and Brocato’s may even make their own, for us our Remoulade of choice is Omi’s from Omi’s Gourmet Foods.  We do make our own Remoulade yet sometimes it is easy to use a prepared one if it is good and suits the dish.  Since this is a quick meal, we chose to use the prepared Remoulade.

Boiled shrimp was our choice since we had some in the refrigerator.  Any type of cooked shrimp (boiled, sautéed, bbq, fried, etc.) will work for this dish.  This is a quick and easy lunch!

Mais C’est Bon!

Enjoy!!

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Stuffed Creole Tomato

What is a Creole Tomato?

A true Creole Tomato is grown in the river parishes south of New Orleans.  The soil and the climate make the tomato a “Creole”.   The tomato is meaty, juicy, thick and a delicacy in south  Louisiana.  Nothing announces summer like
the Creole Tomato and snowballs.  Locals  wait for each to “come in season”.

We purchased Creole Tomatoes at the festival and have enjoyed them all week.  Now we are down to our last big plump juicy delicacy – what to do with it?  We decided to make a tuna salad and stuff the tomato which is large enough to share.

Mais C’est Bon!

Enjoy!!

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Epicurean Heritage

While reading the recent newsletter from the Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans, the name, Belinda Hulin, caught my attention.  Could it be the Belinda that was a good friend of my deceased Uncle John G?  While staring at the name and thinking about my uncle, I knew I had to contact Belinda.  Yes, it was the same Belinda.  Hearing from Belinda brought back many memories and I wanted to explore those memories.  First, I wanted to find out about Belinda and her life.

Belinda’s family like so many others in South Louisiana had been devastated by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  While Belinda and her sister were mucking out the family home in New Orleans and throwing away mementoes, Belinda went upstairs to the second floor.  There on the landing was a box, with papers hanging out, just sitting there like someone had forgotten it.  Continue reading “Epicurean Heritage”

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